Olu Ogunnaike

Exhibited works
Images
Image
Caption

Stock: 178795455, 2018
Charcoal on paper
22 1/8 x 29 7/8 in
56 x 76 cm

Image
Caption

Strange Blooms: 1092.7 to Berlin TP, 2018
Charcoal on paper in handmade frames
32 5/8 x 24 3/4 x 1 1/8 in
83 x 63 x 3 cm

 

Image
Caption

Strange Blooms: 1092.7 to Berlin M, 2018
Charcoal on paper in handmade frames
32 5/8 x 24 3/4 x 1 1/8 in
83 x 63 x 3 cm

Image
Caption

Strange Blooms: 1092.7 to Berlin HC, 2018
Charcoal on paper in handmade frames
32 5/8 x 24 3/4 x 1 1/8 in
83 x 63 x 3 cm

Image
Caption

Stock: 107792391, 2018
Charcoal on polystyrene
294 x 200 x 10 cm

Image
Caption

Stock: 1/4 – 107792391, 2018
Charcoal, polycarbonate, polystyrene
39 3/8 x 19 3/4 x 4 in each
100 x 50 x 10 cm each

Exhibitions
Exhibitions

Foire de Paris 2018
27.04.2018–08.05.2018

International fair
Country: France
City: Paris
      
IRAN OIL SHOW 2018     
IRAN OIL SHOW 2018
06.05.2018–09.05.2018

Tehran International Permanent Fairground
Country: Iran
City: Tehran
      
METALLOOBRABOTKA 2018     
METALLOOBRABOTKA 2018
14.05.2018–18.05.2018

19th International Exhibition for Equipment, Instruments and Tools for the Metal-Working Industry
  

Biography
Biography

  

Born in 1986, London, UK. Lives and works in London.

 

Olu David Ogunnaike is an artist whose practice sits between experiments in sculpture, drawing, performance and installation. In 2013, Ogunnaike developed a pastiche of the industrial sheet material, OSB, deploying it to explore ideas that outline the intimacies of the socio-political spaces we occupy

 

His interest lies in the investigation of the rituals and events that inform our sense of individual and collective self-becoming. Ogunnaike uses nature, and more specifically trees, as a motif of the onlookers of the community in which they grow and occupy; exploring their potential for reflecting systems present in the intimate and public realms we inhabit.

 

Interested in our composite identities, his explorations in the changing states of the materiality of wood look to point to the residues of potential narratives; narratives that become ingrained into a resource inextricably linked to our historical development. What can happen when a tree is uprooted from one geographical setting and turned into an object in another. 

 

His investigations with charcoal in Loose ends don’t tie lead to a literal migration of form. Taking charcoal as the last step in a process of change that this material goes through, asking questions of where did it come from, what may have preceded its current iteration and what surroundings and/or people may have cherished it.